Pupil Premium

Pupil Premium

Historical background

The Pupil Premium gives schools extra funding to raise the attainment of disadvantaged students up to Year 11.

The Government introduced a fund of £625 million in April 2011 to give schools £400 per year for:

  • every student currently registered as eligible for free school meals
  • students who have been looked after for 6 months or longer

From April 2012, Pupil Premium funding was also extended to:

  • all students eligible for free school meals at any point in the past 6 years

In the 2013 to 2014 financial year, funding for the pupil premium increased to £1.875 billion. As a result, the amount given to schools for each student who attracts the funding has increased to £900 per student.

In the 2014 to 2015 financial year, pupil premium funding was £2.5 billion, rising to £2.545 billion in the 2015 to 2016 financial year. The premium rose to:

  • £935 per student of secondary-school age
  • £1,900 per student for looked-after children who:
  • have been looked after for 1 day or more
  • are adopted
  • leave care under a Special Guardianship Order or a Residence Order

School accountability for the Pupil Premium

The Pupil Premium is paid to the college so as we can assess what additional provision our students need and put appropriate strategies in place to address under-performance

Ofsted inspections report on how the funding affects the attainment of disadvantaged students. The Government also hold schools to account through performance tables, which include data on:

  • the attainment of the students who attract the funding
  • the progress made by these students
  • the gap in attainment between  students eligible for pupil premium  and their peers who are not

Pupil premium strategy statement (Treviglas Community College)

1.    Summary information
School Treviglas Community College
Academic Year 2016/17 Total PP budget Date of most recent PP Data Review May 2016
Total number of students 899 Number of students eligible for PP 203 Date for next internal review of this strategy Dec 2016

 

2.   Current attainment -2016 results
Students eligible for PP Students not eligible for PP Students not eligible for PP(national average)
% achieving 5A* – C incl. EM 53.6% 61.5% 64.7%
% achieving expected progress in English / Maths 82.14%/57.1% 80%/64.4% 75.8% / 73.4%
Progress 8 score average -1.08 -0.34 0.12
Attainment 8 score average 40 49 53
3.   Barriers to future attainment (for students eligible for PP)
In-college barriers
A.     Percentage of students eligible for PP with reading age of 11+ years is low
B.      Higher proportion of behaviour incidents (SLT on call) caused by students eligible for PP than non-PP
C.     Students eligible for PP in KS4 making less progress in maths and EBACC subjects in current Year 11 and to a lesser extent in Year 10
D.     Number of students eligible for PP opting for EBACC subjects is low
E.      Progress of hard to reach students and those educated off site is poor
External barriers
F. High rates of absence for students eligible for PP in KS4 (47.8% PP students in Year 10 have attendance of less than 95% and 37.0% of students eligible for PP in Year 11 have attendance of less than 90%. 58.1% PP students in Year 11 have attendance of less than 95% and 29.1% of students eligible for PP in Year 11 have attendance of less than 90%). Overall percentage PA for students eligible for Pupil Premium is 28% compared to non PP which is 13.2%
4.   Desired outcomes Success criteria
A.     For students to improve reading age Students reading age to match chronological age.
B.      Packages for support in place for students with repetitive behaviours causing a barrier to learning. f Gateway Programme, involving external agencies, to raise standards of behaviour for identified students Reduced number of SLT on calls.
C.     College self-review processes to support progress in maths, history, geography, French, Spanish and science Students eligible for PP to meet Progress 8 measure of 0
D.     Increase number of students choosing EBACC subjects in Year 9 (2017) Whole cohort to take one humanity and increased uptake of French and Spanish (50%)
E.      Increased liaison with external education providers Students studying though external providers to attain at least maths, English and one option subject
F.       Increased attendance rates for students eligible for PP Reduce the number of persistent absentees among students eligible for PP to 10% or below.
·         Academic year
Desired outcome Approach How will you ensure it is implemented well? Staff lead When will you review implementation?
Raising attendance College minibus to collect students with high rates of absence HoH overview during session 1 every day, KPIs, SLT agenda, HoH agenda, attendance officer analysis DUN/ONL Fortnightly
Improved behaviour for learning Continued use of Gateway Programme, flexible packages, anger management, counselling, SSS, ELC, Social skills group ECM processes and systems, CPD, KPIs, curriculum review, student voice ONL Half-termly
Improved literacy, oracy and reading ages Read Write Inc. Lexia, handwriting, extra English, English mentoring, flying fours, reading, summer school, small group intervention, enhanced communication, RSC, author visits, speech and language, EAL, Observations/ drop-ins evidence use and effect of range of strategies to develop skills, data grabs. 4Matrix, 

 

DRA Half-termly
Broadening life experience and aspiration Playground to Podium, Freestyle, music, eXtra@, DofE, visits, work experience, community music, nature garden, 7E ECM processes and systems, CPD, KPIs, curriculum review, student voice, parent voice,observations/ drop-ins evidence use and effect of range of strategies to develop skills, data grabs. 4Matrix, MAL Half-termly
Progress for learning Extra maths and English, HoH intervention, interventions, mentoring Observations/ drop-ins evidence use and effect of range of strategies to develop skills, data grabs. 4Matrix, SE cycle, report cycle,  DUN Half termly
Planned expenditure £166,060